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Positive early results in clinical trial

Wisconsin State Journal: Madison Vaccines shows good early results with prostate cancer vaccine

By Judy Newman Link to Article

Summary:
Initial results of the first 13 patients in a clinical trial for a prostate cancer vaccine developed by Madison Vaccines, Inc. show the patients’ immune response is higher and they’ve suffered no adverse health effects…… A second location, at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, will also start enrolling patients to test the vaccine.

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Xconomy reports expansion of series A funding

XCONOMY: Madison Vaccines Expands Series A To Advance Prostate Cancer Drugs

By Jeff Engel Link to Article

Summary:
One key piece of the puzzle could be combining DNA vaccines like the one MVI has developed with other therapies, like checkpoint inhibitors. “We think we’re well-positioned to help answer the question whether a vaccine plus a checkpoint inhibitor can be beneficial to these patients,” Lesniewski said. Unlike the company’s Phase 2 trial testing the effects of MVI-816 fighting solo against early-stage prostate cancer, the combination treatment study will target men with late-stage prostate cancer—after the disease has spread and shows no response to castration therapy, Lesniewski said.

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Start-Up Profile of Madison Vaccines

START-UP: MADISON VACCINES - VACCINES FOR PROSTATE CANCER

By Jim Kling (Contributor) Link to Article(by subscription)

Executive Summary:
Madison Vaccines Inc. is developing two candidates for prostate cancer: MVI-816 trains the patient’s immune system to recognize and attack the cancer as a foreign body by targeting a molecule called prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), which is uniquely displayed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. Madison Vaccines’ second product, MVI-118, targets cells that over-express the androgen receptor.

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Xconomy Profile of Madison Vaccines, Incorporated

XCONOMY: MADISON VACCINES RIDES IMMUNOTHERAPY WAVE WITH EARLY-STAGE PROSTATE DRUG

By Jeff Engel Link to Article

Summary:
According to the article, MVI believes it can succeed where bigger companies haven’t because it is targeting the disease at an earlier stage than most therapeutic approaches. The article explains that “the idea is to prevent, or at least delay, the onset of metastases and the need for castration by priming the immune system to recognize cancerous cells and kill them.” The company is creating vaccines built on research from the lab of Douglas McNeel, M.D., Ph.D., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “We believe the time to engage the immune system is when you have time to train it up over six to 12 weeks, and the battle it has to fight is against a relatively small number of tumor cells,” Lesniewski says.

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Coverage of Press Release Announcing MVI-816 Selection in Prostate Cancer Foundation Supported Research Program

XCONOMY: MADISON VACCINE TO BE TESTED IN COMBINATION PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT

By Jeff Engel Link to Article

Summary:
Madison Vaccines is using a $1.5 million Movember-Prostate Cancer Foundation Challenge Award to expand its research. MVI will test how well its lead DNA vaccine, MVI-816, can shrink tumors when combined with an undetermined PD-1 pathway inhibitor drug to see if a two-pronged approach has a significant effect on fighting the disease.


BIOWORLD TODAY:

Link to Article (by subscription)

Summary:
In the Clinic - Madison Vaccines Inc. announced its lead candidate MVI-816 will be used in a clinical study testing a two-pronged immunotherapy approach to treat metastatic prostate cancer.


WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL: TECH AND BIOTECH: TWO MADISON BIOTECHS TO ADVANCE WITH DRUG TRIALS; A MEDICAL DEVICE COMPANY RECEIVES FUNDS

By Judy Newman Link to Article

Summary:
The article discusses the award to Dr. McNeel and goes on to quote Richard Lesniewski: The PD-1 inhibitors “have shown quite remarkable results” in diseases like melanoma skin cancer and non-small cell lung cancer but have not had much success in patients with metastatic prostate cancer… the PD-1 pathway inhibitor keeps cancer cells from hiding while MVI’s vaccine stimulates the patient’s immune system to fight the cancer cells. “We think those two strategies are going to pair very well.”